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EVENTS

 


2014 marks the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act!

Join us to discover Arizona's wilderness areas and to celebrate your wild place!

Please RSVP only when you are ready to secure a spot on a Wild Stew trip, as we are limited to 15 people in wilderness areas. You will be prompted to create a Meetup account or signin to Meetup (also via Facebook). Meetup is free and does not sell or rent your information to third parties.



Cedar Bench Wilderness © AWC

September 27-28: *new location* Cedar Bench Wilderness, Prescott National Forest

  Join us for National Public Lands Day as we head into Cedar Bench Wilderness to monitor for and remove invasive plant species in the Chasm Creek area. Additional information and Trip Details!

About Cedar Bench Wilderness
Cedar Bench Wilderness was established in 1984 and has a total of 14,950 acres with over 30 miles of trail allowing solitude and wildlife observation. Cedar Bench falls along a broad northwest-southeast trending ridge or "bench," and from this elevated perch visitors can glimpse stunning views of the desert's vivid colors. The Wilderness occupies the dividing line between the Verde River and the Agua Fria River drainages, with the Wild & Scenic Verde River forming a portion of its eastern boundary. The Verde supports many species of wildlife that are endangered or of special interest to biologists. Elevations in the area range between 4,500 feet and 6,700 feet with a primary vegetative cover of chaparral and lesser amounts of pinion pine and Utah juniper. In the lower reaches along the river, saguaro cactus can be found hiding on south facing hillsides.

Trip Details: Trip Details!
Volunteers Needed: 15
Work Type: Monitoring & Removal

RSVP for Cedar Bench Wilderness, September 27-28th

For more information contact Sam Frank, AWC Central Arizona Director, 928-350-2204

 

Wilderness Steward Collecting Data, Mt. Wrightson Wilderness

October 10th (Friday): Individual Wilderness Steward Training, TBD (Prescott or Phoenix)

The Wild Stew program is more than just our AWC-led field events, we also have a cadre of trained individuals who serve as Wilderness Stewards on their own time. Individual Stewards receive training on wilderness philosophy and history, federal wilderness management policy, field monitoring protocols and techniques, first aid, backcountry travel preparedness, and more. This one-day training prepares you to collect field data while you are exploring one of Arizona’s 90 wilderness areas.

We request your commitment to monitor wilderness conditions twice per year, either in different locations or at an adopted area. Simply observe and report, all while enjoying the outdoors. Learn more about the Individual Wilderness Steward Training.

Note: You must have attended at least one (1) Wild Stew field event prior to applying
Details: Class details are provided with confirmed registration
Class Size: 15

RSVP for Individual Wilderness Steward Training, October 10th

For more information contact Sam Frank, AWC Central Arizona Director, 928-350-2204

 

West Clear Creek Wilderness © AWC

October 25-26: West Clear Creek Wilderness, Coconino National Forest

Despite the fact that West Clear Creek Wilderness is only one-half mile to two miles wide, the canyon offers wonderful opportunities for solitude. As for beauty, serenity, and complexity, the hiking is rarely exceeded in Arizona. Wild, primitive, and trail-less, the canyon bottom is narrow and filled with water in places, requiring you to swim or wade if you hike the entire length. The U.S. Forest Service calls West Clear Creek Wilderness "one of the most rugged, remote canyons in northern Arizona." West Clear Creek Canyon, opening on the Verde River on the west, is the longest canyon cutting through the Mogollon Rim along the edge of the Colorado Plateau. The canyon's very steep walls reach as high as 1,000 feet. It extends about 20 miles eastward before splitting into Clover Creek and Willow Valley, which form the headwaters of West Clear Creek. Pine and fir grow higher up, pinion and juniper on the slopes, and along the creek is a riparian habitat dominated by sycamore, alder, and cottonwood. Additional details coming soon.

Trip Details: Coming Soon
Volunteers Needed: 15
Work Type: Monitoring

RSVP for West Clear Creek Wilderness, October 25-26th

For more information contact Sam Frank, AWC Central Arizona Director, 928-350-2204

 

Mazatzal Wilderness © AWC

November 8-9: Mazatzal Wilderness, Tonto National Forest

The 250,517-acre Mazatzal Wilderness is as unique as it is expansive. The northernmost edges skirt up against the Mogollon Rim and the largest contiguous ponderosa pine stand in the world. This area provides unique contrasts between the stream-side environments and surrounding high desert as well as desert grassland and chaparral vegetation. The watersheds have carved out a deep rugged canyon with attendant riparian habitat and supporting a wealth of wildlife and vegetation. A 23.5-mile segment of the Verde River is within the Mazatzals and is designated as “Wild.” Additional details coming soon.

Trip Details: Coming Soon
Volunteers Needed: 15
Work Type: Monitoring

RSVP for Mazatzal Wilderness, November 8-9th

For more information contact Sam Frank, AWC Central Arizona Director, 928-350-2204

 

Wet Beaver Wilderness © AWC

November 22-23: Wet Beaver Wilderness, Coconino National Forest

Winding on a serpentine course through the rim of the Colorado Plateau, Wet Beaver Creek twists through a steep-walled canyon of Supai sandstone and shale. Beyond lovely red cliffs in the lower section, the canyon widens and opens onto the Verde River. It originates about 12 miles east of the Beaver Creek Ranger Station at an elevation of about 6,200 feet and enters the Verde near 3,000 feet. Here we'll find pristine riparian habitat dominated by cottonwoods, sycamores, and alders. Wet Beaver Creek is one of Arizona's finest and rarest natural resources: a perennially flowing desert stream. The year-round waters attract large numbers of wildlife: elk and deer, bears and lions, smaller mammals, reptiles, and birds. Additional details coming soon.

Trip Details: Coming Soon!
Volunteers Needed: 15
Work Type: Monitoring

RSVP for Wet Beaver Wilderness, November 22-23rd

For more information contact Sam Frank, AWC Central Arizona Director, 928-350-2204

 

Four Peaks Wilderness © AWC

December 6-7: Four Peaks Wilderness, Tonto National Forest

Located at the southern end of the Mazatzal Mountains in the Tonto National Forest, Four Peaks Wilderness encompasses 60,740 acres and was designated by the Arizona Wilderness Act of 1984. The tallest of the ‘four peaks’ is Brown’s Peak (7,657’) which is also the tallest peak in Maricopa County. Elevations within the wilderness can differ by as much as 5,000’ feet making for very diverse flora, fauna and weather. Four Peaks Wilderness is also notable for the high-grade amethyst quartz found within the 1.5 billion year old granite comprising the upper elevations. Additional details coming soon.

Trip Details: Coming Soon
Volunteers Needed: 15
Work Type: Monitoring

RSVP for Four Peaks Wilderness, December 6-7th

For more information contact Sam Frank, AWC Central Arizona Director, 928-350-2204

 

 

-Arizona Wilderness Coalition mission statement